Dhammadayadā

arahant-kassapa3

AFTER THE BUDDHA’S PARINIBBĀNA What remains to be said about the Venerable Mahākassapa’s relation to Ānanda is closely connected with his leading role in the Sangha after the Buddha’s passing away. At the demise of the Buddha only two of the five most prominent disciples were present, Ānanda and Anuruddha. Sāriputta and Mahāmoggallāna had expired …

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arahant-kassapa2

HOW KASSAPA CAME TO THE BUDDHA Continuing our story, we shall now return to Mahākassapa. Where did he go after he had come to the crossroads? As mentioned above, when the two ascetics separated, the earth shook by the force of their act of renunciation. The Buddha perceived this trembling of the earth and knew …

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ARAHANT  KASSAPA 

ARAHANT KASSAPA’S EARLY YEARS Shortly before his parinibbāna the Buddha had refused to appoint a personal successor. Instead, he urged the monks to look upon the Dhamma and the Vinaya—the doctrine and the discipline—as their Master, for within the teachings proclaimed during his forty-five-year ministry they could find all the instructions they needed to tread …

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Enlightened Nuns 1

Vuḍḍhapabbajita Summna Theri Known as Princess Sumanā, she was the daughter of the king of Kosala and sister of king Pasenadi. She is included among the eminent female lay supporters. She once visited the Buddha, with five hundred royal maidens in five hundred royal chariots, and questioned him regarding the efficacy of giving. The Commentary …

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Arahant Moggallana4

Once Moggallāna saw with the divine eye how King Pasenadi had been defeated in battle by the Licchavis and how afterwards he had gathered his troops again and vanquished them. When Moggallāna reported this, some monks accused him of falsely boasting about his supernormal faculties, which is a disciplinary offence making a monk subject to …

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Arahant Moggallana3

THE MOST EXCELLENT PAIR OF DISCIPLES For a Fully Enlightened One his two chief disciples and his personal attendant are as necessary as the ministers of war, of the interior, and of finance are to a king. The Buddha himself used this comparison with a state’s administration. He spoke of Ānanda, who could remember all …

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Arahant Moggallana2

The Buddha himself had gone to Rājagaha, where the king of Magadha soon became his follower and donated to him the Bamboo Grove Monastery. He was living at that monastery when Kolita and Upatissa returned to Rājagaha, where they were offered accommodations at Sañjaya’s place. One day Upatissa had gone to the town while Kolita …

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Arahant Moggallana1

Youth In a small town named Kolita, near Rājagaha, capital of the kingdom of Magadha, a child was born who was destined to become the second chief disciple of the Buddha. The boy’s parents named him Kolita, after the town. The family belonged to the Moggallāna clan, one of the most illustrious brahmin clans of …

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Arahant Sariputta4

“Then go and announce our coming,” said the elder. “And if she asks why I have come, tell her that I shall stay in the village for one day, and ask her to prepare my birth chamber and provide lodgings for five hundred bhikkhus.”   Uparevata went to his grand-aunt and said: “Grand-aunt, my uncle …

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